Malasias new landmark - Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque.

Malasias new landmark - Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque.

Putrajayas new landmark Mosque was built using six thousand tonnes of steel, which accounts for a staggering 70% of all construction materials used. The recently completed Tuanku Mizan Zainal Adidin Mosque opened its door to muslims and non-muslims throughout the world on 4th September 2009. Known as ‘The Iron Mosque’, it will be the second principle mosque in Putrajaya, sitting a neighbourly two kilometers away from the Putra Mosque. Designated as a tourist attraction, the management have been urged not to restrict access to Muslims alone.

The mosque has been designed around three concepts of wind, simplicity and transparency. It caters for 20,000 worshipers. The main prayer hall houses the Mihrab wall that directs the worshipers towards the “kiblat” (direction of Mecca). The Khat is inscribed into the back of the anti-reflective glass, giving a sense of verses floating down from the sky. The Mihrab is inscribed with the Quaranic versus in the Alasakh calligraphic-style. The ‘Sahn’ is the overflow prayer area outside the main prayer hall and the entrance to this is via a gateway called the ‘Internal Iwan’.

The architecture of the mosque features stainless steel grilles, based on Islamic motifs, mirroring traditional Islamic architecture in a contemporary style. The whole building is open and  cool even without any air-con because the space allows the wind and air to pass through the wall-less corridors.

Muslims working and living in Putrajaya can now perform their prayers at another awe-inspiring landmark.

Inside the 'Iron Mosque' - designed around three conepts of wind, simplicity and transparency.

Inside the 'Iron Mosque' - designed around three concepts of wind, simplicity and transparency.

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